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Flame Extinction in Fires

Sébastien Vilfayeau, James White, Taylor Myers (Ph.D.s)

Advisor: 
Sponsor: 
NSF, FM Global, United Technologies Research Center (GOALI program)
Collaborators: K. Meredith, N. Ren,, Y. Wang (FM Global); A.W. Marshall, P.B. Sunderland (UMD)

The general objective of this research project is to support the development and validation of large eddy simulation (LES) models used to simulate the effects of flame extinction in compartment fires, including the response of fires to smoke accumulation and restricted air ventilation and/or the response of fires to the activation of water-based suppression systems. The specific objectives are to: perform detailed LES simulations of the structure and dynamics of compartment fire flames subjected to extinction conditions; evaluate the classical modeling approach for flame extinction in fires based on the concept of a critical value of the flame temperature; develop and evaluate a new modeling approach based on the concept of a critical value of the flame Damköhler number; and provide a companion computational component to the experimental component of the UMD fire suppression research program (led by Prof. Marshall).

Numerical simulations are performed with two advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) capabilities: FireFOAM developed by FM Global (https://github.com/fireFoam-dev) and the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://firemodels.github.io/fds-smv/). Both CFD-based fire models feature state-of-the-art computational environments and physical modeling capabilities, including advanced LES models and multi-physics models (e.g., to describe turbulence, mixing, pyrolysis, combustion, convective heat transfer, radiative heat transfer, etc).

Simulations of laboratory-scale turbulent buoyancy-driven line diffusion flames. The flame is approximately 50 kW in size and is supplied by a centrally-located planar fuel stream surrounded by two planar co-flow oxidizer streams. The co-flow streams correspond to either air diluted by nitrogen or air carrying a water mist. Left figure: FDS. Right figure: FireFOAM.

New!

Watch video animations of FireFOAM simulations of the new UMD line burner experiment:

To learn more:

White, J.P., Link, E.D., Trouvé, A.C., Sunderland, P.B., Marshall, A.W., Sheffel, J.A., Corn, M.L., Colket, M.B., Chaos, M. and Yu, B. (2015) “Radiative emissions measurements from a buoyant, turbulent line flame under oxidizer-dilution quenching conditions,” Fire Safety J. 76:74-84.

Vilfayeau, S., Ren, N., Wang, Y. and Trouvé, A. (2015) “Numerical simulation of under-ventilated liquid-fueled compartment fires with flame extinction and thermally-driven fuel evaporation,” Proc. Combust. Inst., 35:2563–2571.

Lecoustre, V.R., Arias, P.G., Roy, S.P., Luo, Z., Haworth, D.C., Im, H.G., Lu, T.F. and Trouvé, A. (2014) “Direct numerical simulations of non-premixed ethylene-air flames: local flame extinction criterion,” Combust. Flame, 161:2933-2950.

 

 

Sebastien, James and Taylor

Sébastien Vilfayeau (left) is a Doctorate Student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. For further information about his research, Sébastien can be contacted at: svilfaye@umd.edu

James White (center) is a Doctorate Student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. For further information about his research, James can be contacted at: jwhite21@umd.edu

Taylor Myers (right) is a Doctorate Student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. For further information about his research, Taylor can be contacted at: tmacksmyers@gmail.com